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Climate, Conflict & Demography in Africa

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CLIMATE, CONFLICT & DEMOGRAPHY IN AFRICA


When:

14/9/2021

1:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Location:

Zoom

Admission:

Free (donations to RAS gratefully received)

JOIN THE DEBATE ON ONE OF THE MOST PRESSING GLOBAL ISSUES OF OUR TIME

 

Climatic and demographic change are global trends that are already having a profound impact on Africa. Both create growing pressure on natural and human resources and increase the risk that political, economic, and social tensions and disagreements turn violent. Conflict often exacerbates the problems and hinders mitigating action. Neither climate nor demography are susceptible to quick or easy solutions, so long-term strategies to reduce the risks are increasingly necessary and urgent.

 

To address these policy dilemmas and look at actions that governments and the international community should take, Africa Confidential, the International Crisis Group and the Royal African Society are jointly hosting a major, high-level virtual conference on 14th September to ensure that African voices can be heard in advance of the COP-26 Climate Conference to be held in Glasgow in November.

 

Besides top-level keynote speakers, the conference will include expert panels focussing on the three main issues: the economic consequences of climate and demographic change, the security implications, and the international dimension.

 

The aim is to draw up key messages and recommendations to pass to COP-26 itself and for follow-up action with African governments and their international partners.

 

Register now! Details of the programme and Keynote speakers will be published shortly.

 

This event will be live-streamed via Zoom and Facebook. The Zoom link will be sent out to all those registered.

 

Delivered in partnership with Africa Confidential and the International Crisis Group and supported by Open Society Foundations.

 

Photo credit: Girls carry water on their bicycles at a dispensary in Nedogo village near Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, 16 February 2018. REUTERS/Luc Gnago
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